Category Archives: At Home

Cue the cheers and confetti!

Happy New Year!  Have you noticed any thoughts of possible resolutions drifting through your mind these days?  Personally, I dislike resolutions … they seem to come pre-packaged with the cynical threat of failure.  I prefer the anticipation of embracing new ideas, trying new things, and nurturing new habits.  These seem somehow friendlier and more approachable.  And so, may I humbly submit for your consideration this friendly and (perhaps) new habit for 2014:  Found-Object Doodling!

I saw this, a couple of days ago, on the inkygirl blog by children’s book writer & illustrator Debbie Ridpath Ohi, and I wanted to share it with you:

A Portrait in Ink and Parsley
A Portrait in Ink and Parsley

“Found Object Doodles (a.k.a. Sometimes It’s Okay To Play With Your Food Before Eating It)”  by Debbie Ridpath Ohi

Ah!  Inspiring in the best sense of the word, because this is something everyone can do!  Click on the photo above, or the article link, to read (and see) more.  Doodling will warm-up your creative muscles, and there’s no pressure to “make it perfect”.  It’ll bring a smile to your face and to those around you.  It contributes more art to the world and reminds us that art is all around us.  And all it takes to get started is a Sharpie in your pocket.

Cheers!

Something Worth Fighting For

I must share this:

“Unfortunately, in one way or another the world is going to tell you every day that you shouldn’t try to be an artist. But for three minutes here today, I want to tell you that you should. I hope you do it. With everything you have.” ~Blake Morgan

Read the full essay on Huffington Post’s The Third Metric – Redefining Success Beyond Money and Power, “Art and Music are Professions Worth Fighting For”.

Bookmark it.  Share it on Facebook.  Tweet about it.  Refer to it in conversations with school committee officials and policy wonks, businesspeople and community leaders.  Print it out and bring it to your holiday family dinners, to have at-the-ready!  And please, share it with your kids.

Many thanks, C.B., for reading so much and sharing the good stuff!

One Last Sip of Summer

Artist collaborates with her 4-year-old - 02
©2013 Mica Angela Hendricks

The weather today in southern New England was glorious, like a last sip of summer vacation even though we’re a month into the new school year.  I was lucky enough to find a moment to pause and feel the sun on my face today, and in that moment I laughed at my naïve August optimism that I would be able to protect the unhurried feeling of summer vacation and carry it through the school year.  Nope.  Just over a month in, and I’ve already signed up myself and my kids for too many things!

Something’s gotta give, but I still want to keep this blog going.  I’ll let it unfold organically this year and see what happens.  For today, I wanted to share with you this lovely piece about the unexpected delights that can occur when we make art!

click the link below, or the picture above, to read more 🙂

“Collaborating with a 4-year Old”, from The Busy Mockingbird, 8/27/2013

iBabies

Baby Uh-Oh

I’ll admit, I am concerned about the generation of iBabies.  Are you?  Someday (on my long list of somedays) I’ll write a post about this, but for today, here’s something to get you thinking

“One of the issues with “online learning” is the ever-growing abundance of hyperlinks on webpages.  Sites are encouraged, in fact, to fill their text with external links as it raises their search engine indices.  However, the convention of linking diverse sources disrupts the temporal linearity of any textual thought.  Each link serves as its own digression to another topic, and so the wholeness of an otherwise cogent text becomes fundamentally fragmented.  Replete with blue underlined phrases, Wikipedia is so successful because of its relatively concise presentation of a general topic, with plenty of opportunities (links) for tangential discovery.  However, research confirms that, although web-based learning increases students’ ability to “multitask,” it diminishes their capacity to think abstractly and creatively.”

You can read the full text by clicking here (no irony intended).